With occasional reflection on the perpetual absurdity/intrigue of life and society in general.

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Boy in a Box - Original Images #01

boy in a box - Original Images #01  

by Tod Gorman:


Images by boy in a box. Early explorations with still imagery/photography.













Monday, December 20, 2010

Bill Hicks - One Night Stand - Video

This is Bill Hicks' One Night Stand in its entirety - just for your viewing, comedic, and mental pleasure.
Oh yeah, Bill was also from TX and considered Austin a second home.

"Bill Hicks - another dead hero."



Bill Hicks - One Night Stand (28 mins.)
video

Friday, December 17, 2010

The Tree of Life, by Terrence Malick - Official Poster and Trailer

Malick's most recent cinematic poetry of existential contemplation - The Tree of Life. It has been long awaited by cinephiles around the world (myself included), and after viewing the trailer, it would seem that it has been well worth it - goose bumps and chills (i don't get that from a trailer often). I am thoroughly intrigued and in wonderment over the thematic weight (reminiscent of 2001 Space Odyssey). I am a bit bewildered by how this man continues to get large budgets for 2 1/2 hr experimental, poetic narratives, but I'm happy as hell that he does.


Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Tracy Morgan Explains Star Wars - Hilarious!

Last week, Tracy Morgan stopped by Late Night for a chat with Jimmy Fallon. During the interview, Morgan went on a hilarious tangent about Star Wars—specifically, the beginning of The Empire Strikes Back. His attempted explanation/reenactment is inside. - post by Matt Cherette (Gawker.TV)


Tuesday, December 14, 2010

First Poster and Synopsis for Terrence Malick’s THE TREE OF LIFE

The Tree of Life opens May 27, 2011.


The Synopsis:

From the Desk of Terrence Malick….

We trace the evolution of an eleven-year-old boy in the Midwest, JACK, one of three brothers. At first all seems marvelous to the child. He sees as his mother does with the eyes of his soul. She represents the way of love and mercy, where the father tries to teach his son the world’s way of putting oneself first. Each parent contends for his allegiance, and Jack must reconcile their claims. The picture darkens as he has his first glimpses of sickness, suffering and death. The world, once a thing of glory, becomes a labyrinth.

From this story is that of adult Jack, a lost soul in a modern world, seeking to discover amid the changing scenes of time that which does not change: the eternal scheme of which we are a part. When he sees all that has gone into our world’s preparation, each thing appears a miracle—precious, incomparable. Jack, with his new understanding, is able to forgive his father and take his first steps on the path of life.

The story ends in hope, acknowledging the beauty and joy in all things, in the everyday and above all in the family—our first school—the only place that most of us learn the truth about the world and ourselves, or discover life’s single most important lesson, of unselfish love.


Follow the link for more info.

Beatnik Wanton - Image of intrigue

Thanks to one of my favorite blogs, If Charlie Parker Was a Gunslinger... , for the image - too funny, and culturally intriguing on many levels. Follow the link for more pop culture photographs and images.

Beatnik Wanton (by Don Elliot, Corinth Publications: 1964)

Friday, December 10, 2010

Bressonian Quote #15 - Notes from a Master Filmmaker

"A film cannot be a stage show, because a stage show requires flesh-and-blood presence. But it can be, as photographed theatre or CINEMA is, the photographic reproduction of a stage show. The photographic reproduction of a stage show is comparable to the photographic reproduction of a painting or of a sculpture. But a photographic reproduction of Donatello's Saint John the Baptist or of Vermeer's Young Woman with Necklace has not the power, the value or the price of that sculpture or that painting. It does not create it. Does not create anything." - Robert Bresson

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Photo Journal of Austin Series, Part 4: Full Moon Over Austin


Above Image by Meghann Sumner

Photo Journal of Austin Series, Part 4: Full Moon Over Austin
The following images were taken from the Hill at Butler Park, next to the Palmer Events Center and Dougherty Arts Center, overlooking the River. They were photographed by Meghann Sumner and Tod Gorman (me) on an extraordinary Austin night - filled with sounds of children and family, English and Spanish intertwining musically, under a full moon, and the lights of the fountain glowing and encouraging communal amusement.

This unique park features a fountain that displays programmed morning, afternoon and evening water shows, an observation hill overlooking Lady Bird Lake, a children's garden and a meadow.The park consists of a total of 22 acres.

Butler Park is one of Austin's first "green" parks. The park is irrigated with non-potable water from Lady Bird Lake. All the equipment purchased to maintain the park is "clean" - either powered by propane or electricity.
For more information: Austin Parks and Recreation.

Images by Tod Gorman and Meghann Sumner:











Friday, December 3, 2010

Thursday, December 2, 2010

McCain Calls Pentagon's 'Don't Ask' Study Flawed (NPR) - and Subjective Commentary

Sen. John McCain (right) delivers his opening remarks during a hearing Thursday on the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy. The Arizona Republican is the ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Sen. John McCain rejected a Pentagon study on "don't ask, don't tell" as flawed and said it would be dangerous to allow gays to serve openly in the military during a time of war.
For the continued article, follow the link: NPR, McCain on 'Don't Ask'.
It's official... though there was a time when I wasn't absolutely certain (before campaign Palin 2008, Arizona Immigration Legislation, and DADT debate), but I should have known - all of the significant signs were there. Here it is (my commentary), a revelation to some and common knowledge to others -
John McCain is a complete Douchebag!

Blogs of Interest - Flickeringmyth.com, and The Frustrated Ramblings of an Aspiring Filmmaker

Frustrated Ramblings: 3D - The Future of Cinema?

DJ Haza with more "Frustrated Ramblings Of An Aspiring Filmmaker"...
3D seems to be the next big thing in cinematic leaps forward, but is it really all it’s cracked up to be? Bullets seemingly fly past your head, explosions leap off the screen and the film world surrounds you in three different dimensions. Or so we are led to believe. Is 3D the eye-watering future of cinema or a cinematic gimmick that just makes your eyes water?

There have been some real big endorsements of 3D in film with James Cameron’s Avatar (2009) smashing all box office records and Martin Scorsese telling The Guardian of his admiration for 3D. The Oscar-winning Mr. Scorsese told Mark Kermode, “I always liked 3D. I mean we are sitting here in 3D. We are in 3D. We see 3D. So why not?” Scorsese has just finished shooting his most recent project, Hugo Cabret, which unusually for him is a family friendly film and his first shot in 3D. Scorsese has stated that it has allowed him to “rethink cinema” and has “liberated” his filmmaking. He continues by assuring film fans that he hasn’t resorted to using the new technology as a “gimmick”. Only time will tell.

James Cameron’s Avatar (2009) is hailed by some as the pinnacle of 3D after its huge success at box office’s worldwide. Some even say it redefined cinema and dawned a new age of 3D filmmaking. However, the story was appalling in my opinion and no matter how much CGI, 3D or other effects were thrown at me I was bored. Five minutes in I had lost all faith in the film and it was never reinstated. My eyes grew sore, my patience thin and I wanted the film to end as soon as possible. To this day this is my only real 3D cinematic experience and I couldn’t care if it was my last...

To read more, follow the link: Flickeringmyth.com
For more from DJ Haza, you can follow the link to his blog: The Frustrated Ramblings of an Aspiring Filmmaker.

Always happy to have insightful support on one of my paramount (pardon the pun) vexations with contemporary cinema. Indeed, Cameron is a gray-haired techie with an elementary mind for story (to say the least) and a 4 yr old's egocentric sense of self. He has never, by any stretch or assertion, aspired to artistic innovation or thematic wisdom (except perhaps in his own mind's eye). Yet, his cause for 3D imagery and video game ascetic has universally captivated the studio interests - and giving lobotomized children a warhead, calling it a toy, and asking them to be creative with it is never a good idea. As for Scorsese, Burton, and other self-aware filmmakers embracing the new notion of three dimensions in cinema, i am bewildered and a bit saddened. The illusion has always been there, by the way (an integral function of cinematic artistry) - the new 3D simply puts your creative mind to rest with less participation and honest stimulation. That's right, Cameron and the studios are assuming the audience (YOU and ME) stupid and inadequate to play a participatory role in the cinematic experience, and, as of yet, they have not been proven wrong by the masses. Thanks to DJ Haza and Flickeringmyth for the "Frustrated Ramblings." I feel your pain.